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JOHNSON CITY, TN 
#1
56th
TOP
U.S.​CITY
TAX-FRIENDLY, FIRST-CLASS HEALTH CARE & PLENTY TO DO

MOST AFFORDABLE CITY IN THE U. S.

*MARKETWATCH.COM 2017
BEST PLACE TO LIVE
IN THE U. S. 
RETIREMENT  DESTINATIONS
Kiplinger Magazine

Top Adventure Town
2018

LOWEST
6th Best School District/TN

CITY PROPERTY TAX RATE OF THREE MAJOR CITIES
Blue Ridge Outdoors
Magazine
NICHE Rating
U.S. Dept. Educ.
Impact of a
Storm Water Project
Founder's Park, King Commons and the Downtown Pavillion
T​​he City turned two storm water projects into passive parks that were designed to flood. The flood mitigation program in downtown has worked for normal to heavy rains, however we have another phase that is necessary to handle the kind of excessive rains we have had this summer.  These two parks have sparked downtown development.

The Founder's Park Pavillion/Farmer's Market has become a "gathering" place for downtown visitors and other events. Development around these parks has spearheaded much of the downtown growth.
King Commons
Founder's Park
Amphitheater
Founder's Park
​Creek
Founder's Park
Pavilion & Farmer's Market
Looking Ahead
Regional Growth
Projections
Infrastructure
Projects/Quality of Life

​Education,
Workforce & Jobs

Population growth projections for ​our region is one of the most critical issues we face today.  With estimates of barely1.5% growth year over year for the next decade, all elected leaders must be concerned.    Compared to the 94 people per day moving into the Nashville market, we barely have 94 per month.  

Even more concerning is the demographic mix.  The average age of our citizens in Northeast Tennessee is 39 years compared to 34 years in Nashville.  We have to ask, where are the young people going?  Our biggest challenge is to leverage the features of our region to attract and retain young people.  Demographic diversity is essential for growth and economic robustness for our future.

We must invest in features in our  community that are attractive to younger people.  Understanding that many may pick a place first because it enhances their lifestyle will guide us in those investments.  They tell us access to outdoor recreation, community gatherings, great schools, high speed broadband and a sense of community are attributes they seek.  Once they find their preferred lifestyle, then they decide how they will make a living.




Build it they will come!  
One of the key functions of a City is to build and maintain the infrastructure to support citizens with needed services, i.e. water, sewer, storm water, streets, parks, athletic fields, trails, schools and events.
 
The storm water project at Founder’s Park is an example of an innovative investment that turned what could have been a simple detention basin into a passive park that was designed to flood, if needed.  The park became the catalyst for downtown development.  The return on that investment is significant.

We have the opportunity for other infrastructure projects to stimulate growth by attracting young people to our City.   Projects such as Tannery Knobs Mountain Bike Park, the Tweetsie Trail, Winged Deer Sports Complex, neighborhood rehab projects to include re-lighting, sidewalk improvements, clean-up & home improvements through HUD funds are projects that are key drivers in our future.
We must prioritize and fund these projects  to enhance to attractiveness and effectiveness of Johnson City.






We recently lost the interest of a company who loved the location of East Tennessee to add a manufacturing center for their​​​​​​​ business that would have needed 1,000 jobs.  Their reason for not closing the deal -- we did not have a work ready workforce and our citizens were not healthy.  This was a sobering message to the economic development communities, elected leaders and our educational institutions.​

We know that East Tennessee is at the epicenter of the Opioid epidemic.  We must aggressively work with health care, mental health, education, legislators and law enforcement to create a model of interdiction for not only the opioid issue but for drug use in general.

Workforce readiness is a partnership between public education and the private sector.  Ensuring secondary students transition to college or vocational training is essential.   Designing these programs so students exit with certifications, appreticeships, internships or co-ops will build a better prepared workforce.

​A strong, prepared, healthy workforce is essential to our growth.






Our growth is our future.
                                                                                                                                                                                                     

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Increasing the "Built" Environment, Improving Our Quality of Life